Program Details

Who Am I? The Basic Goodness of Being Human


with Judith Robison & Stephen McGahee & Ellen Knapp
October 17 / 7:00 PM - November 21 / 9:00 PM

Who am I?  The Basic Goodness of Being Human 


The first course in this series asks the questions “Who am I?” and focuses on the sense of self.  It includes teachings on basic goodness, selflessness, the arising of ego and cocoon, buddha nature, and the confidence of warriorship.  We will practice contemplative investigations of the self, based upon the Foundations of Mindfulness.  




Overview of the Basic Goodness Series


The new Basic Goodness Series is open to everyone, without prerequisites.  We strongly recommended that participants first receive basic meditation instruction during an open house, a Shambhala Training program, or a Learn to Meditate Day.  It would also be good if a student could attend a Meditation in Everyday Life course before entering the Basic Goodness Series.(see Course 1 of the Everyday Life Series)  However, these are not firm prerequisites.


The Basic Goodness Series is an introduction to the view of Shambhala, taught in an experiential way.  The key difference between the Everyday Life series and the Basic Goodness series is that the Everyday Life classes emphasize personal transformation in everyday life while the Basic Goodness Courses emphasize the experiential study of view and meaning.  The Basic Goodness Series is the next step after completing the Everyday Life Series OR it can be the first series of courses that you take.


The Basic Goodness Series is comprised of 3 courses.  Each course has a question and a title.


1. Who am I?  The Basic Goodness of Being Human  [6 classes]


2. How can I help?  The Basic Goodness of Society [6 classes]


3. What is Real?  The Basic Goodness of Reality [6 classes]


 


How can I help?  The Basic Goodness of Society


The second course asks the question, “How can I help?” and explores our relationships with others, an aspiration to help our world, and specific aspects of social transformation. We look at a Shambhala understanding of society, and what enlightened society may be. Is society something that is ultimately confused, or is there goodness in human society?  The course focuses on transforming four aspects of society:  relations with family (household), professional life, entertainment, and economy. We learn the traditional mahayana practice of “sending and taking” (tong len).


What is Real?  The Basic Goodness of Reality 


The third course asks the question, “What is Real?” and focuses on a study of the phenomenal world. It emphasizes some of the core Buddhist teachings, such as impermanence, the process of perception, the "mind," and emptiness.  It is oriented towards the experience of sacred world, the magic and wonder of the natural elements.  There is an ecological element to the class. 


This course focuses on the sense of self. It includes teachings on basic goodness, selflessness, the arising of ego, the 5 Skandhas: cocoon, buddha nature, and the confidence of warriorship. It also includes the practice of contemplation, investigating the self, based on the Four Foundations of Mindfulness.


 


 For questions or more information please contact Ellen Knapp: ellenk55@aol.com

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