Program Details

Sadhana of Mahamudra


with Nathan Railla
December 18 / 6:30 PM - December 18 / 8:30 PM


"[The Sadhana's] purpose was to bring together the two great traditions of the Vajrayana, as well as to exorcise the materialism which seemed to pervade spiritual disciplines in the modern world. The message that I had received from my supplication was that one must try to expose spiritual materialism and all its trappings, otherwise true spirituality could not develop. I began to realize that I would have to take daring steps in my life."


                  -from Chogyam Trungpa's Epilogue to Born in Tibet.

Everyone is welcome. Participation is free of charge, but please register below so we know how to set up the space.


The Sadhana of Mahamudra is a practice text composed by the Vidyadhara Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, the founder of Shambhala. He wrote the Sadhana in a sacred cave in Bhutan in 1968 at an important turning point in his presentation of the Buddhist teachings in the West. This sadhana is considered terma, teachings concealed by the great Tibetan teacher Padmasambhava for the sake of future generations. Such teachings are discovered by tertöns, special teachers who are able to find the teachings during the times when they are most needed. Trungpa Rinpoche was one of the great modern tertöns and the Sadhana of Mahamudra is such a teaching.


This practice is meant for our particular time as a means of overcoming the obstacles of spiritual materialism in our practice, our lives and the world. Because it was meant for this time, it’s potency is particularly strong. Sadhana may be translated as "means of accomplishment."


The sadhana is based on two main principles—the principle of space associated with the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism and the principle of energy associated with the Kagyü school. The text is full of symbolism that may seem strange. Don't expect to understand it fully the first time. You can simply chant the words and relax into the atmosphere that doing so creates.


The practice lasts a little over an hour and involves both chanting and silent meditation. Texts for the practice are provided at the Center.

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