Program Details

THE SUPREME THOUGHT: Personal Path and Enlightened Society


with Richard John
May 25 / 9:00 AM - May 26 / 6:00 PM

What thought first arises in our minds when we wake up in the morning? When we shift our attention? When we begin a new activity? Is it “me?” Is it the task at hand? Is it “others?” Is it positive or negative?


In the Shambhala Buddhist tradition this is called the “supreme thought,” lhasam in Tibetan. It is our recurring first thought—the one that reflects our intentions, governs our activities, and ultimately determines the course of our lives. It can be driven by accumulated habits and confusion, or it can re-direct us toward the path of awakening. This is our choice.


There is a further consideration. Will our idea of a personal path require us to separate from the pain and confusion of the everyday world? Or is it possible for our path to be the source of inspiration and change for the benefit of human society, as well as ourselves?


We will explore these questions during this special weekend program.  The program is open to everyone, though it is best to have received meditation instruction in advance. 


Online registration is recommended. Please note that it is not necessary to pay for the program at time of registration.


Our generosity policy applies to this program.  If you wish a program scholarship, please email your request to financecoordinator@lexingtonshambhala.org prior to the program.  


To inquire about meditation instruction, contact Judith Broadus at jbroadus99@aol.com or call 859-225-4183.


Acharya Richard John


An early student of  Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, Richard was appointed an acharya (senior teacher) by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche. He completed the first three-year group retreat at Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, and for many years has taught Shambhala Buddhist programs internationally. Acharya John has worked as a designer, a project manager, and management consultant. He is known for his experiential and practical approach to connecting the traditional teachings with daily life.

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