Program Details

Creating Enlightened Society: Leadership and the Art of Social Transformation


with Arawana Hayashi
January 19 / 7:30 PM - January 19 / 9:00 PM

A public talk by one of our precious, senior teachers


Given the many challenges facing the world, many of us long for social change and the ability to help. But how do we genuinely bring about social transformation? How do we help the world without creating more blame and aggression? Where do we begin, and what is the path?

In this evening talk Acharya Arawana Hayashi will lead an exploration on the art of social transformation through the path of meditative awareness and profound leadership. Through combining the insight, awareness, and compassion of the meditative journey with social and organizational involvement, we can help bring about meaningful change in the world.

Every society is a ceremony that reflects the attitude of individuals toward themselves and others. We have been participating in somebody else’s ceremony — a ceremony of being asleep. But we have the power to shift the direction of our destiny by engaging in enlightened society — a ceremony of being awake.
~Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche


Acharya Arawana Hayashi
A long-time student of Buddhism and the Shambhala teachings, Acharya Arawana Hayashi is a dancer, choreographer, and teacher, with roots in Asian and Western arts. She has been on the faculty of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School and Naropa University. Acharya Hayashi teaches meditation and creative process at the Shambhala Institute for Authentic Leadership in Halifax and innovative leadership workshops. She recently completed a three-year term as teacher-in-residence at Karmê Chöling.


Price
Suggested Donation: $20
Membership discounts apply. For financial aid or work-study please contact Mery Miguez, volunteer [at] sfshambhala [dot] org, at least a week in advance. No one will ever be turned away for lack of funds.


Registration
Please pre-register online to help us plan for the class.


Contact
Kathryn: programs [at] sfshambhala [dot] org

Go to San Francisco's website